Meet the Team users

  • Dr. Rand T. Mattson DDS

    read more…Dr. Rand T. MattsonRand T. Mattson Graduated from Northwestern University Dental School, and has been in practice since 1982. He enjoys interacting and developing a relationship with each and every patient. His main concern is you and your overall health.

    He has been an ADA SUCCESS lecturer since 1990. Dr. Mattson has been published for his digital radiography article in Winter 2005 issue of Patterson Today (Dr. Mattson was featured on the cover), also digital radiography article in Insight Dentistry Magazine. (2006) His office has been featured in Patterson Today magazine and is currently pictured in Patterson's equipment catalogues.

    Other publications include “Before Your Move – Get Moving” – January 2007 Compendium, “Assessing Your Practice’s “Peel”” – February 2007 Contemporary Esthetics. He was a volunteer dentist for all the athletes at Olympic Village during the 2002 Winter Olympics. He freelance lectures on Hi-tech office integration, digital radiography, and practice management.

    He is a past president of the Utah Dental Association, and served as a member of ADA Council on Ethics Bylaws and Judicial Affairs. His wife Cynthia is a CPA who works with dentists providing financial, tax, and practice management services.
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  • Dr. Scott L. Miller DDS

    read more…Dr. Scott L. MillerDr. Scott Miller represents compassion, gentleness, and quality dentistry at Rock Run Dental. He seeks the best for his patients through modern technology, continuing education, and meeting each patient’s specific needs. He graduated from Boyne School of Dentistry in 1989. He has been a dental consultant for Vocational Rehabilitation of the state of Utah for 23 years. His greatest love in dentistry is changing his patient’s smiles and lives through cosmetic dentistry. His passions outside of dentistry are his wife and six children, serving in his church, and music.×

  • Amee Front Desk

    read more…AmeeAmee has worked at our office since March of 2007. She completed the Dental Assisting program at the OWATC in 2001. Amee loves the friendships built with patients, and seeing the end result of a patient’s commitment to invest in their oral health. Amee loves spending time outdoors camping, hunting, and bbq’s, with her family. She has a wonderful husband and two children Aislynn and River.×

  • Alisa Front Desk

    read more…AlisaAlisa has been working in dentistry since 1996. At Rock Run Dental, she has worked as an administrative assistant since 2012. She enjoys greeting each patients and getting to know them. She enjoys camping with her husband and four children. Her hobbies include crafting and searching for vintage treasures.×

  • Tatiana Hygienist

    read more…TatianaTatiana is a dental hygienist. She grew up in Brigham City and graduated from Weber State with a dental hygiene degree in 2007. She has been with Rock Run Dental since 2011. She loves her family and enjoys spending time with her husband, Rob, and their two children, Evva and Kehl. She loves being active, music, interior design, spending time with family, and learning new things. She enjoys seeing her patients progress as they use the skills learned during each visit. She is grateful to play a vital role in the oral health of each of her patients.×

  • Diane Hygienist

    read more…DianeDiane has been working with Dr. Mattson since 1986. She graduated from Weber State University as a Registered Hygienist in 1984. Diane LOVES what she does and loves being part of dental team that provides EXCEPTIONAL dental care. Diane along with Dr. Mattson created an amazing hygiene program. They were awarded the Adult Preventive Care Practice of 2011 sponsored by 3M ESPE Preventive Care. Diane and Dr. Mattson currently travel the country lecturing to other dental offices and conventions all over the nation.

    Diane loves music, the mountains, the beach, hanging out with her husband Kory and her children Brook and Blake, She loves football and her pets. Diane’s favorite thing about dentistry is when a patient realizes that their oral hygiene care affects their overall health.×

  • Brandi Hygienist

    read more…BrandiBrandi has worked in the dental field since 2008. She graduated from Weber State University dental hygiene program in 2014. She was awarded The Golden Scaler Award for her outstanding clinical skills. . She has worked for Dr. Miller for two years. She was married to her amazing husband Cameron in 2012. They also have the world’s best lab named Brecken. She and Cameron love camping, hiking, and are sports fanatics. Brandi’s number one goal at Rock Run Dental is improving her patient’s oral and over all health. In her own words, “I’m very lucky I get to wake up and go to a job I love!”×

  • Jamee Hygienist

    read more…JameeJamee has been a hygienist at Rock Run Dental for over 17 years. She graduated with honors from Weber State University with her bachelors in dental hygiene. He favorite thing about being a hygienist is her ability to help people improve not only their smiles but also their overall health. Jamee enjoys life, cooking, gardening, the outdoors, serving in her church, but most of all being a mom and spending time with her two sweet daughters and her husband.×

  • Jennifer Dental Assistant

    read more…JenniferJennifer has been working with Dr. Mattson since 1999 and graduated from Bryman College in 1995 in dental assisting. She takes pride in being the head assistant and enjoys working in a high tech. dental office. She has a wonderful husband and four children. One of the four is their dog Boulder. Jennifer enjoys camping, barbequing, and sitting around the fire. She also loves football. She enjoys making people feel great about their smiles. She is a caring individual and loves to help the patients feel comfortable.×

  • Skylie Dental Assistant

    read more…SkylieSkylie has been employed at Rock Run Dental since 2012. She attended school at the Ogden-Weber Applied Technology Center graduating as a Certified Dental Assistant. Her attention in the dental field is drawn to making a difference in patient’s lives, by helping them to achieve confidence in their smile and create lasting friendships. She was married in March 2016 and enjoys spending time with her husband. Skylie and her husband enjoy movies, vacationing, target shooting, and random adventures. Her hobbies include enjoying the outdoors, camping with her family, and reading good books.×

  • Glenda Dental Assistant

    read more…GlendaAt Rock Run Dental, Glenda has been working as a dental assistant with Dr. Mattson for 4 years. She has been in the dental field many years as an assistant and owned a lab with her husband where she worked as a lab technician. She loves her grandkids, the outdoors, sun, hiking, camping and just walking the neighborhood. Being from California, she really misses the ocean.×

Services Provided layers

+ Dental Implants

Dental implants are a great way to replace missing teeth and also provide a fixed solution to having removable partial or complete dentures. Implants provide excellent support and stability for these dental appliances. Implants do many things including: • Replace a missing tooth or multiple missing teeth. • Restores function from a missing tooth or teeth. You will chew better with teeth that look and feel natural. • Naturally restores smiles visually damaged by missing teeth. • Provides firm support for loose dentures allowing you to chew better and feel more confident by keeping dentures in place allowing you to enjoy a less restricted diet. • Eliminate the need for bridges. When implants are used in place of a bridge we do not have to grind down the teeth on either side of the space.

+ Cleanings & Prevention

A preventive program is a cooperative effort by the patient, dentist, and dental staff to preserve the natural dentition and supporting structures by preventing the onset, progress, and recurrence of dental diseases and conditions. Preventing dental disease starts at home with good oral hygiene and a balanced diet. It is continued in the dental office by the efforts of your dentist and dental hygienist to promote, restore, and maintain your oral health. Prevention also includes regular dental exams, cleanings, and x-rays. Sealants and fluoride are also great preventive treatments that help protect the teeth. Prevention helps avoid serious and costly dental problems and is the key to having a healthy, confident, beautiful smile.

+ Dental X-Rays

Bite Wing X-rays help us find decay between teeth, evaluate bone levels supporting your teeth, and assess any broken or chipped teeth. We use digital x-rays that provide us with an instant image and use 80% less radiation, which is safer for you. Dental x-rays may reveal:

  • Abscesses or cysts
  • Bone loss
  • Cancerous and non-cancerous tumors
  • Decay between the teeth
  • Developmental abnormalities
  • Poor tooth and root positions
  • Problems inside a tooth or below the gum line
Detecting and treating dental problems at an early stage can save you time, money, unnecessary discomfort, and your teeth!

+ Panoramic X-Rays

Every 3-5 years we will take a digital panoramic x-ray. this image shows us a comprehensive view of your mouth including, teeth, roots, jawbone, joints, and sinuses. In addition a Panoramic x-ray will:

  • Assess patients with an extreme gag reflex
  • Screen for TMJ disfunction
  • Expose cysts and abnormalities
  • Expose impacted teeth
  • Expose jawbone fractures
  • Plan treatment (full and partial dentures, braces and implants)
  • Reveal gum disease and cavities
How are panoramic X-rays taken? The panoramic X-ray provides the dentist with an ear-to-ear two-dimensional view of both the upper and lower jaw. The most common uses for panoramic X-rays are to reveal the positioning of wisdom teeth and to check whether dental implants will affect the mandibular nerve (the nerve extending toward the lower lip). The Panorex equipment consists of a rotating arm that holds the X-ray generator, and a moving film attachment that holds the pictures. The head is positioned between these two devices. The X-ray generator moves around the head taking pictures as orthogonally as possible. The positioning of the head and body is what determines how sharp, clear and useful the X-rays will be to the dentist. The pictures are magnified by as much as 30% to ensure that even the minutest detail will be noted. Panoramic X-rays are an important diagnostic tool and are also valuable for planning future treatment. They are safer than other types of X-ray because less radiation enters the body.

+ Disclosing Solution

Disclosing solution is food coloring applied to teeth after brushing and flossing. It temporarily colors any place where plaque is present. This allows you and our staff to see areas where you need more attention to insure the cleanest possible teeth.

+ Prophylaxis

Our assistant or hygienist will prophy (polish) your teeth. The hygienist will use hand scaler and/or ultrasonic instruments as well as polishing paste to remove plaque, stains, and calculus (hard deposits). We may also use a prophy jet which gently cleans with a mixture of air, water and baking soda. The prophy Jet is especially effective in eliminating stubborn stains from coffee, tea, and smoking.

+ Dental Exams

During your visit, the hygienist with examine your x-rays and teeth and discuss her findings with the dentist before he examines your teeth. The results of the exam will be recorded in your computer record, and any needed treatment will be noted and discussed with your before scheduling and appointments. There are multiple parts to a dental exam including:

  • Examination of diagnostic x-rays (radiographs): Essential for detection of decay, tumors, cysts, and bone loss. X-rays also help determine tooth and root positions.
  • Oral cancer screening: Check the face, neck, lips, tongue, throat, tissues, and gums for any signs of oral cancer.
  • Gum disease evaluation: Check the gums and bone around the teeth for any signs of periodontal disease.
  • Examination of tooth decay: All tooth surfaces will be checked for decay with special dental instruments.
  • Examination of existing restorations: Check current fillings, crowns, etc.
+ Oral Cancer Exam

It is important to note that around 75 percent of oral cancers are linked with modifiable behaviors such as smoking, tobacco use and excessive alcohol consumption. Your dentist can provide literature and education on making lifestyle changes and smoking cessation. When oral cancer is diagnosed in its earliest stages, treatment is generally very effective. Any noticeable abnormalities in the tongue, gums, mouth or surrounding area should be evaluated by a health professional as quickly as possible. During the oral cancer exam, the dentist and dental hygienist will be scrutinizing the head, neck, and oral regions carefully for signs of pathologic changes. The following signs will be investigated during a routine oral cancer exam: • Red patches and sores – Red patches on the floor of the mouth, the front and sides of the tongue, white or pink patches which fail to heal and slow healing sores that bleed easily can be indicative of pathologic (cancerous) changes. • Leukoplakia – This is a hardened white or gray, slightly raised lesion that can appear anywhere inside the mouth. Leukoplakia can be cancerous, or may become cancerous if treatment is not sought. • Lumps – Soreness, lumps or the general thickening of tissue anywhere in the throat or mouth can signal pathological problems.

+ Oral Hygiene Aids

We will provide you with all the necessary take home product to maintain a healthy smile. Here are some of the most common oral hygiene aids for homecare:

Dental Flosses

Dental floss is the most common interdental and subgingival (below the gum) cleaner and comes in a variety of types and flavors. The floss itself is made from either thin nylon filaments or polyethylene ribbons, and can help remove food particles and plaque from between the teeth. Vigorous flossing with a floss holder can cause soft tissue damage and bleeding, so great care should be taken. Floss should normally be used twice daily after brushing.

Interdental Cleaners

Many hygienist & periodontists recommend interdental brushes in addition to dental floss. These tiny brushes are gentle on the gums and very effective in cleaning the contours of teeth in between the gums. Interdental brushes come in various shapes and sizes.

Mouth Rinses

There are two basic types of mouth rinse available: Cosmetic rinses which are sold over the counter and temporarily suppress bad breath, and therapeutic rinses which may or may not require a prescription. Most dentists are skeptical about the benefits of cosmetic rinses because several studies have shown that their effectiveness against plaque is minimal. Therapeutic rinses however, are regulated by the FDA and contain active ingredients that can help reduce bad breath, plaque, and cavities. Mouth rinses should generally be used after brushing.

Oral Irrigators

Oral irrigators, like Water Jets and Waterpiks have been created to clean debris from below the gum line. Water is continuously sprayed from tiny jets into the gum pockets which can help remove harmful bacteria and food particles. Overall, oral irrigators have proven effective in lowering the risk of gum disease and should not be used instead of brushing and flossing. Professional cleanings are recommended at least twice annually to remove deeper debris.

Rubber Tip Stimulators

The rubber tip stimulator is an excellent tool for removing plaque from around the gum line and also for stimulating blood flow to the gums. The rubber tip stimulator should be traced gently along the outer and inner gum line at least once each day. Any plaque on the tip can be rinsed off with tap water. It is important to replace the tip as soon as it starts to appear worn, and to store the stimulator in a cool, dry place.

Tongue Cleaners

Tongue cleaners are special devices which have been designed to remove the buildup of bacteria, fungi and food debris from the tongue surface. The fungi and bacteria that colonize on the tongue have been related to halitosis (bad breath) and a great many systemic diseases like diabetes, heart disease, respiratory disease and stroke. Tongue cleaners can be made from metal, wood or plastic and shaped in accordance with the contours of the tongue. Tongue cleaning should be done prior to brushing to prevent the ingestion of fungi and bacteria.

Toothbrushes

There are a great many toothbrush types available. Electric toothbrushes are generally recommended by dentists because electric brushes are much more effective than manual brushes. The vibrating or rotary motion helps to easily dislodge plaque and remove food particles from around the gums and teeth. The same results can be obtained using a manual brush, but much more effort is needed to do so. Manual toothbrushes should be replaced every three months because worn bristles become ineffective over time. Soft bristle toothbrushes are far less damaging to gum tissue than the medium and hard bristle varieties. In addition, an appropriate sized ADA approved toothbrush should be chosen to allow proper cleaning to all the teeth. Teeth should ideally be brushed after each meal, or minimally twice each day.

+ How to Properly Brush & Floss

Brushing and flossing are of paramount importance to oral hygiene. Though bi-annual professional dental cleanings remove plaque, tartar and debris, excellent homecare methods are equally valuable. Proper brushing and flossing can enhance the health of the mouth, make the smile sparkle and prevent serious diseases. Reasons why proper brushing and flossing are essential:

  • Prevention of tooth decay – Tooth decay is one of the leading causes of tooth loss, and its treatment often requires complex dental procedures. Tooth decay occurs when the acids found in plaque erode the natural enamel found on the teeth. This phenomenon can easily be prevented by using proper home hygiene methods.
  • Prevention of periodontal disease – Periodontal disease is a serious, progressive condition which can cause tooth loss, gum recession and jawbone recession. Periodontal disease is caused by the toxins found in plaque, and can lead to serious health problems in other parts of the body. Removing plaque and calculus (tartar) from the surface of the tooth using a toothbrush, and from the interdental areas using dental floss, is an excellent way to stave off periodontal problems.
  • Prevention of halitosis – Bad breath or halitosis is usually caused by old food particles on or between the teeth. These food particles can be removed with regular brushing and flossing; leaving the mouth healthier, and breath smelling fresher.
  • Prevention of staining – Staining or the yellowing of teeth can be caused by a wide variety of factors such as smoking, coffee and tea. The more regularly these staining agents are removed from the teeth using brushing and flossing techniques, the less likely it is that the stains will become permanent.

The Proper Way to Brush

The teeth should be brushed at least twice a day; ideally in the morning and before bed. The perfect toothbrush is small in size with soft, rounded-end bristles and no more than three months old. The head of the brush needs to be small enough to access all areas of the mouth, and the bristles should be soft enough so as not to cause undue damage to the gum tissue. The American Dental Association (ADA) has given electric toothbrushes their seal of approval; stating that those with rotating or oscillating heads are more effective than other toothbrushes. Here is a basic guide to proper brushing:
  1. Place the toothbrush at a 45-degree angle where the gums and teeth meet.
  2. Use small circular motions to gently brush the gumline and teeth.
  3. Do not scrub or apply too much pressure to the teeth, as this can damage the gums and tooth enamel.
  4. Brush every surface of every tooth, cheek-side, tongue-side, and chewing surfaces. Place special emphasis on the surfaces of the back teeth.
  5. Use back and forth strokes to brush the chewing surfaces.
  6. Brush the tongue to remove fungi, food and debris.

The Proper Way to Floss

Flossing is a great way to remove plaque from the interdental regions (between the teeth). Flossing is an especially important tool for preventing periodontal disease and limiting the depth of the gum pockets. The interdental regions are difficult to reach with a toothbrush and should be cleansed with dental floss on a daily basis. The flavor and type of floss are unimportant; choose floss that will be easy and pleasant to use. Here is a basic guide to proper flossing:
  1. Cut a piece of floss to around 18 inches long.
  2. Wrap one end of the floss around the middle finger of the left hand and the other end around the middle finger of the right hand until the hands are 2-3 inches apart.
  3. Work the floss gently between the teeth toward the gum line. Curve the floss in a U-shape around each individual tooth and carefully slide it beneath the gum line.
  4. Carefully move the floss up and down several times to remove interdental plaque and debris.
  5. Do not pop the floss in and out between the teeth as this will inflame and cut the gums.

+ Composite Fillings

A composite (tooth colored) filling is used to repair a tooth that is affected by decay, cracks, fractures, etc. The decayed or affected portion of the tooth will be removed and then filled with a composite filling. There are many types of filling materials available, each with their own advantages and disadvantages. You and your dentist can discuss the best options for restoring your teeth. Composite fillings, along with silver amalgam fillings, are the most widely used today. Because composite fillings are tooth colored, they can be closely matched to the color of existing teeth, and are more aesthetically suited for use in front teeth or the more visible areas of the teeth. As with most dental restorations, composite fillings are not permanent and may someday have to be replaced. They are very durable, and will last many years, giving you a long lasting, beautiful smile. Reasons for composite fillings:

  • Chipped teeth
  • Closing space between two teeth.
  • Cracked or broken teeth.
  • Decayed teeth.
  • Worn teeth.

How are composite fillings placed?

Composite fillings are usually placed in one appointment. While the tooth is numb, your dentist will remove decay as necessary. The space will then be thoroughly cleaned and carefully prepared before the new filling is placed. If the decay was near the nerve of the tooth, a special medication will be applied for added protection. The composite filling will then be precisely placed, shaped, and polished, restoring your tooth to its original shape and function. It is normal to experience sensitivity to hot and cold when composite fillings are first placed, however this will subside shortly after your tooth acclimates to the new filling. You will be given care instructions at the conclusion of your treatment. Good oral hygiene practices, eating habits, and regular dental visits will aid in the life of your new fillings.

+ Porcelain Crowns (Caps)

A crown (or cap) is a covering that encases the entire tooth surface restoring it to its original shape and size. A crown protects and strengthens tooth structure that cannot be restored with fillings or other types of restorations. Although there are several types of crowns, porcelain (tooth colored crown) are the most popular, because they resemble your natural teeth. They are highly durable and will last many years, but like most dental restorations, they may eventually need to be replaced. Porcelain crowns are made to match the shape, size, and color or your teeth giving you a natural, long-lasting beautiful smile. Reasons for crowns: • Broken or fractured teeth. • Cosmetic enhancement. • Decayed teeth. • Fractured fillings. • Large fillings. • Tooth has a root canal.

+ Porcelain Veneers

Veneers are very thin pieces of durable, tooth shaped porcelain that are custom made (for shape and color) by a professional dental laboratory. They are bonded onto the front of teeth to create a beautiful and attractive smile. Veneers can completely reshape your teeth and smile. They can often be alternatives to crowns and the ideal solution in treating many dental conditions. As with most dental restorations, veneers are not permanent and may someday need replacement. They are very durable and will last many years, giving you a beautiful long lasting smile. Reasons for porcelain veneers:

  • Cosmetically, to create a uniform, white, beautiful smile.
  • Crooked teeth.
  • Misshapen teeth.
  • Severely discolored or stained teeth.
  • Teeth that are too small or large.
  • Unwanted or uneven spaces.
  • Worn or chipped teeth.

What does getting porcelain veneers involve?

Getting veneers usually requires two visits to complete the process, with little or no anesthesia required during the procedure. The teeth are prepared by lightly buffing and shaping the surface to allow for the thickness of the veneer. A mold or impression of the teeth is taken and a shade (color) will then be chosen by you and the dentist. On the second visit the teeth will be cleansed with special liquids to achieve a durable bond. Bonding cement is then placed between the tooth and veneer and a special light beam is used to harden and set the bond. You will receive care instructions for veneers. Proper brushing, flossing and regular dental visits will aid in the life of your new veneers.

+ Teeth Whitening

Teeth whitening (or bleaching) is a simple, non-invasive dental treatment used to change the color of natural tooth enamel and is an ideal way to enhance the beauty of your smile. Because having whiter teeth has now become the number one aesthetic concern of most patients, there are a number of ways to whiten teeth. The most popular method is using a home teeth whitening system that will whiten teeth dramatically. Since teeth whitening only works on natural tooth enamel, it is important to evaluate replacement of any old fillings, crowns, etc. Replacement of any restorations will be done after bleaching so they will match the newly bleached teeth. Teeth whitening is not permanent. A touch-up may be needed every several years, and more often if you smoke, drink coffee, tea, or wine. Reasons for teeth whitening: • Fluorosis (excessive fluoridation during tooth development). • Normal wear of outer tooth layer. • Stained teeth due to medications (tetracycline, etc.). • Yellow, brown stained teeth.

+ What is Periodontal (Gum) Disease?

The term “periodontal”means “around the tooth.” Periodontal disease (also known as periodontitis and gum disease) is a common inflammatory condition which affects the supporting and surrounding soft tissues of the tooth; also the jawbone itself when in its most advanced stages. Periodontal disease is most often preceded by gingivitis which is a bacterial infection of the gum tissue. A bacterial infection affects the gums when the toxins contained in plaque begin to irritate and inflame the gum tissues. Once this bacterial infection colonizes in the gum pockets between the teeth, it becomes much more difficult to remove and treat. Periodontal disease is a progressive condition that eventually leads to the destruction of the connective tissue and jawbone. If left untreated, it can lead to shifting teeth, loose teeth and eventually tooth loss. Periodontal disease is the leading cause of tooth loss among adults in the developed world and should always be promptly treated.

Types of Periodontal Disease

When left untreated, gingivitis (mild gum inflammation) can spread to below the gum line. When the gums become irritated by the toxins contained in plaque, a chronic inflammatory response causes the body to break down and destroy its own bone and soft tissue. There may be little or no symptoms as periodontal disease causes the teeth to separate from the infected gum tissue. Deepening pockets between the gums and teeth are generally indicative that soft tissue and bone is being destroyed by periodontal disease. Here are some of the most common types of periodontal disease:
  • Chronic periodontitis – Inflammation within supporting tissues cause deep pockets and gum recession. It may appear the teeth are lengthening, but in actuality, the gums (gingiva) are receding. This is the most common form of periodontal disease and is characterized by progressive loss of attachment, interspersed with periods of rapid progression.
  • Aggressive periodontitis – This form of gum disease occurs in an otherwise clinically healthy individual. It is characterized by rapid loss of gum attachment, chronic bone destruction and familial aggregation.
  • Necrotizing periodontitis – This form of periodontal disease most often occurs in individuals suffering from systemic conditions such as HIV, immunosuppression and malnutrition. Necrosis (tissue death) occurs in the periodontal ligament, alveolar bone and gingival tissues.
  • Periodontitis caused by systemic disease – This form of gum disease often begins at an early age. Medical condition such as respiratory disease, diabetes and heart disease are common cofactors.

+ Diagnosis of Periodontal Disease

Periodontal disease is diagnosed by your dentist or dental hygienist during a periodontal examination. This type of exam should always be part of your regular dental check-up. A periodontal probe (small dental instrument) is gently used to measure the sulcus (pocket or space) between the tooth and the gums. The depth of a healthy sulcus measures three millimeters or less and does not bleed. The periodontal probe helps indicate if pockets are deeper than three millimeters. As periodontal disease progresses, the pockets usually get deeper. Your dentist or hygienist will use pocket depths, amount of bleeding, inflammation, tooth mobility, etc., to make a diagnosis that will fall into a category below: Gingivitis Gingivitis is the first stage of periodontal disease. Plaque and its toxin by-products irritate the gums, making them tender, inflamed, and likely to bleed. Periodontitis Plaque hardens into calculus (tartar). As calculus and plaque continue to build up, the gums begin to recede from the teeth. Deeper pockets form between the gums and teeth and become filled with bacteria and pus. The gums become very irritated, inflamed, and bleed easily. Slight to moderate bone loss may be present. Advanced Periodontitis The teeth lose more support as the gums, bone, and periodontal ligament continue to be destroyed. Unless treated, the affected teeth will become very loose and may be lost. Generalized moderate to severe bone loss may be present.

+ Periodontal Treatment

Periodontal disease progresses as the sulcus (pocket or space) between the tooth and gums gets filled with bacteria, plaque, and tartar, causing irritation to the surrounding tissues. When these irritants remain in the pocket space, they can cause damage to the gums and eventually, the bone that supports the teeth! If the disease is caught in the early stages of gingivitis, and no damage has been done, one to two regular cleanings will be recommended. You will also be given instructions on improving your daily oral hygiene habits and having regular dental cleanings. If the disease has progressed to more advanced stages, a special periodontal cleaning called scaling and root planing (deep cleaning) will be recommended. It is usually done one quadrant of the mouth at a time while the area is numb. In this procedure, tartar, plaque, and toxins are removed from above and below the gum line (scaling) and rough spots on root surfaces are made smooth (planing). This procedure helps gum tissue to heal and pockets to shrink. Medications, special medicated mouth rinses, and an electric tooth brush may be recommended to help control infection and healing.

+ Maintenance of Periodontal Disease

It only takes twenty four hours for plaque that is not removed from your teeth to turn into calculus (tartar)! Daily home cleaning helps control plaque and tartar formation, but those hard to reach areas will always need special attention. Once your periodontal treatment has been completed, your dentist and dental hygienist will recommend that you have regular maintenance cleanings (periodontal cleanings), usually four times a year. At these cleaning appointments, the pocket depths will be carefully checked to ensure that they are healthy. Plaque and calculus that is difficult for you to remove on a daily basis will be removed from above and below the gum line. In addition to your periodontal cleaning and evaluation, your appointment will usually include:

  • Examination of diagnostic x-rays (radiographs): Essential for detection of decay, tumors, cysts, and bone loss.X-rays also help determine tooth and root positions.
  • Examination of existing restorations: Check current fillings, crowns, etc.
  • Examination of tooth decay: Check all tooth surfaces for decay.
  • Oral cancer screening: Check the face, neck, lips, tongue, throat, cheek tissues, and gums for any signs of oral cancer.
  • Oral hygiene recommendations: Review and recommend oral hygiene aids as needed. (Electric toothbrushes, special periodontal brushes, fluorides, rinses, etc.)
  • Teeth polishing: Remove stain and plaque that is not otherwise removed during tooth brushing and scaling.
  • Good oral hygiene practices and periodontal cleanings are essential in maintaining dental health and keeping periodontal disease under control!

+ Dentures & Partial Dentures

A denture is a removable dental appliance replacement for missing teeth and surrounding tissue. They are made to closely resemble your natural teeth and may even enhance your smile. There are two types of dentures - complete and partial dentures. Complete dentures are used when all of the teeth are missing, while partial dentures are used when some natural teeth remain. A Partial denture not only fills in the spaces created by missing teeth, it prevents other teeth from shifting. A Complete denture may be either “conventional” or “immediate.” A conventional type is made after the teeth have been removed and the gum tissue has healed, usually taking 4 to 6 weeks. During this time the patient will go without teeth. Immediate dentures are made in advance and immediately placed after the teeth are removed, thus preventing the patient from having to be without teeth during the healing process. Once the tissues shrink and heal, adjustments will have to be made. Dentures are very durable appliances and will last many years, but may have to be remade, repaired, or readjusted due to normal wear. Reasons for dentures:

  • Complete Denture - Loss of all teeth in an arch.
  • Partial Denture - Loss of several teeth in an arch.
  • Enhancing smile and facial tissues.
  • Improving chewing, speech, and digestion.

What does getting dentures involve?

The process of getting dentures requires several appointments, usually over several weeks. Highly accurate impressions (molds) and measurements are taken and used to create your custom denture. Several “try-in” appointments may be necessary to ensure proper shape, color, and fit. At the final appointment, your dentist will precisely adjust and place the completed denture, ensuring a natural and comfortable fit. It is normal to experience increased saliva flow, some soreness, and possible speech and chewing difficulty, however this will subside as your muscles and tissues get used to the new dentures. You will be given care instructions for your new dentures. Proper cleaning of your new dental appliance, good oral hygiene, and regular dental visits will aid in the life of your new dentures.

+ Fixed Bridges

A dental bridge is a fixed (non-removable) appliance and is an excellent way to replace missing teeth. There are several types of bridges. You and your dentist will discuss the best options for your particular case. The “traditional bridge” is the most popular type and is usually made of porcelain fused to metal. This type of bridge consists to two crowns that go over two anchoring teeth (abutment teeth) and are attached to pontics (artificial teeth), filling the gap created by one or more missing teeth. Dental bridges are highly durable and will last many years, however they may need replacement or need to be re-cemented due to normal wear. Reasons for a fixed bridge:

  • Fill space of missing teeth.
  • Maintain facial shape.
  • Prevent remaining teeth from drifting out of position.
  • Restore chewing and speaking ability.
  • Restore your smile.
  • Upgrade from a removable partial denture to a permanent dental appliance.

What does getting a fixed bridge involve?

Getting a bridge usually requires two or more visits. While the teeth are numb, the two anchoring teeth are prepared by removing a portion of enamel to allow for a crown. Next, a highly accurate impression (mold) is made which will be sent to a dental laboratory where the bridge will be fabricated. In addition, a temporary bridge will be made and worn for several weeks until your next appointment. At the second visit, you permanent bridge will be carefully checked, adjusted, and cemented to achieve a proper fit. Occasionally your dentist may only temporarily cement the bridge, allowing your teeth and tissue time to get used to the new bridge. The new bridge will be permanently cemented at a later time. You will receive care instructions at the conclusion of the procedure. Proper brushing, flossing and regular dental visits will aid in the life of your new permanent bridge.

+ Root Canal Therapy

Root canal therapy is needed when the nerve of a tooth is affected by decay or infection. In order to save the tooth, the pulp (the living tissue inside the tooth), nerves, bacteria, and any decay are removed and the resulting space is filled with special, medicated, dental materials, which restore the tooth to its full function. Having a root canal done on a tooth is the treatment of choice to save a tooth that otherwise would die and have to be removed. Many patients believe that removing a tooth that has problems is the solution, but what is not realized is that extracting (pulling) a tooth will ultimately be more costly and cause significant problems for adjacent teeth. Root canal treatment is highly successful and usually lasts a lifetime, although on occasion, a tooth will have to be retreated due to new infections. Signs and symptoms for possible root canal therapy: • An abscess (or pimple) on the gums. • Sensitivity to hot and cold. • Severe toothache pain. • Sometimes no symptoms are present. • Swelling and/or tenderness. Reasons for root canal therapy: • Decay has reached the tooth pulp (the living tissue inside the tooth). • Infection or abscess have developed inside the tooth or at the root tip. • Injury or trauma to the tooth.

+ Laser Dentistry

We use the laser to reshape healthy gum tissues or to remove diseased tissue. It is also used to decontaminate gum tissue which is infected with periodontal disease. Dental lasers help us treat conditions in the mouth using light energy. The laser is very selective, penetrating to a specific depth in the particular kind of tissue we are treating. The laser beam simultaneously sculpts tissue, sterilizes, and minimizes bleeding. This minimizes pain during and after the procedure and contributes to faster healing. Here are some of the other benefits associated with laser dentistry: • Faster healing and tissue regeneration. • Preservation of more of the natural tooth. • Reduced bleeding during and after treatment. • Reduced need for anesthesia. • Reduced need for stitches and sutures. • Reduced risk of bacterial infections after procedures.

Location & Hours map

Main Office 5985 S 3500 W
Roy UT 84067
(801) 985-4000
Monday
7:00 am - 4:00 pm
Tuesday
7:00 am - 4:00 pm
Wednesday
7:00 am - 4:00 pm
Thursday
7:00 am - 4:00 pm
Friday
7:00 am - 4:00 pm
Saturday
Closed
Sunday
Closed

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